Millennials Don’t Just Want Coffee, They Want The Origin Story Too

Jan 05, 18 Millennials Don’t Just Want Coffee, They Want The Origin Story Too

Approximately 30% of the population drinks coffee occasionally, but much more of the millennial population regularly consumes coffee, leading to some major changes within the industry.


According to BBC News, an increasing number of millennial coffee drinkers are choosing to pay more for coffee if they can find out exactly where the product came from and how to was distributed.


The United Nation’s World Intellectual Property Organization (Wipo) discovered that the three factors that are contributing to this shift in coffee sales are smarter processing, branding, and marketing, especially in relation to coffee growers and their local communities.


“I do like to know that it’s [coffee] ethically sourced because you just feel better about drinking it,” said Amy, a millennial marketing executive.


In addition to knowing exactly where the coffee product came from, millennials are just as concerned with making sure the coffee farmers are being fairly compensated for their beverages and their hard work.


“It is important that the farmer gets a fair price for the coffee they sell,” added Eric, a millennial logistics manager.


The global coffee market is still thriving currently at the $200 billion level, but the majority of coffee drinkers might stop visiting so many chain shops if it means they are feeling more connected to their drinks.


In a paper titled The Powerful Role of Intangibles in the Coffee Value Chain, the focus on producer origins is much more common in smaller coffee shops than found in major supply chains.


“Although still small in volume, independent third wave brands and cafes have been able to create a highly visible new trend and are expanding their footprint in many countries, altering consumer expectations and influencing the whole industry,” read a segment of the paper.

“People want to know that they are doing good and they don’t want to buy something from a supply chain that is corrupt,” said Ryan de Oliveria, chief executive at The Attendant, a London-based cafe.

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