iPhone Technicians Can Tear Apart Your Phone In 10 Minutes

Screws may not be something of great interest to many people, but there is a multitude of options that make them a pretty fascinating topic. Screws that are on such a small scale that you can’t use conventional tools to work on them, screws that have washers and other components built in, and much more. If you’ve ever taken apart an old smartphone, whether that be because it’s broken and you’re curious, or simply because you’re technically minded, you know that they’re full of tiny screws. In fact, there are 21 tiny screws inside of the Apple iPhone 6S which hold it together. These little micro screws were designed specifically to work with small and fragile products like the internals of your phone. Cell phone repair technicians have special tools that allow them to work with these small products, and allow them to take them apart with relative ease. Obviously, your standard screwdriver would not be enough to do it. Thankfully, unless you’re a technician yourself, you won’t have to try and tinker with these tools. But what about other small-scale projects that you might be working on? What can you do about those? What options do you have that you can work with? There are a lot of options that you can pick from. If you need a washer, get an SEMS screw. They are small screws that can come with those annoying little components. No frustration included. Micro screws are the obvious choice for small electronics, but a SEMS screw, which comes in many sizes, is also a viable choice. And if you end up getting your screw stuck, or stripping it, there are ways to handle that too. Most technicians are probably familiar with many of the ways to handle stripped screws without damaging anything inside, and can probably do it in minutes, like the repair technician in the video linked far above. For the rest of us? These tips can help. So the next time you’re looking at your phone,...

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Rogue Wikipedia Editors Blackmail Small Businesses

Sep 02, 15 Rogue Wikipedia Editors Blackmail Small Businesses

Posted by in Featured, Technology

Blogs have become so much more than online rants. A study from ContentPLUS found that blogs are 63% more likely to influence the purchasing decisions of consumers than magazines are, while HubSpot discovered that companies that blog also get 55% more traffic, and have 434% more pages indexed in search engines. This means that bloggers can increase a site’s revenue, get it more visitors, and even boost its search engine ranking. They can also apparently blackmail small businesses. The Independent reports that “rogue editors” at Wikipedia have been targeting hundreds of small businesses and minor celebrities in Britain in an intricate blackmail scam, charging them money to create positive Wikipedia entries. The victims, which range from a wedding photographer to a former Britain’s Got Talent star to a high-end jewelry store in East London, faced demands for hundreds of pounds to “protect” or update their businesses’ Wiki pages. Dan Thompson, the general manager of British holiday company Quality Villas, said that he’d tried to set up a Wikipedia page for the company earlier this year, but received a message from someone whom he believed to be associated with Wikipedia. They told him that his company’s page had been “declined because of lack of notability and the content up there did not meet Wiki requirements.” The sender then offered to rewrite the content, and use their own “privileges” to publish it. The rhetoric led Thompson to fall for the scam. He was even grateful that someone would do that for him. Shortly after, a new version of his post was up, and the “editor” sent him a charge for $400 [£260], which he duly paid. Wikipedia has already blocked 381 accounts in an action against the “co-ordinated group” of con artists, and deleted 210 articles they created. Many of these articles were promotional, and typically included biased or skewed information, unattributed material, and potential copyright violations. They were also similar enough for investigators to suspect that they’d been made by the same person or persons. A two-month investigation, which was dubbed “Orangemoody” after the...

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No One Really Says LOL Anymore, According to New Study

Aug 31, 15 No One Really Says LOL Anymore, According to New Study

Posted by in Featured, Technology

AOL Instant Messenger revolutionized how tweens and teens socialized. Not only did it probably help everyone learn to type faster than 225 words per minute — the minimum speed needed to become certified by the National Court Reporters Association — but it also popularized emoticons, and abbreviations. Nowadays, AIM is just a nostalgic relic. According to a 2011 report, AIM held a 0.7% share of the world messenger market. Emojis have replaced emoticons. Craziest of all, “LOL” is also going the way of the dino, too, according to a recent study by Facebook. The new analysis looked at content from the final week of May and found that “haha” is the most common way to express laughter on Facebook. Specifically, 51.4% of people used the term “haha,” while 33.7% used an emoji to express laughter. “LOL” is so infrequently used — just 1.9% — that people actually say “hehe” more, which had a 13.1% share. Gender, age, and location all factored in to the way laughter is expressed. Men tended to use “haha” and hehe” more, while women usually chose an emoji. The study also had some rather unexpected findings. “Hehe” might be a more childish sounding form of laughter, but the median age of users who preferred to say “haha” was actually lower than that of those who chose “hehe.” In other words, the younger Facebook users aren’t saying “hehe” — the older ones are. The median age of those who relied on “LOL” was also the highest median age of anyone in the group, which included Facebook users ages 13 to 70. Location also seemed to play a factor. Oddly enough, Ohio actually seemed to be torn between “haha” and “LOL.” On the West Coast, people say “haha” and “hehe” more so than anywhere else in the country, while Southern states tended to stick with “LOL.” In the Midwest, they like to use emoji, as do folks in Florida and Wyoming. The study was limited, though. It did leave out the ways...

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Social Media Is Making Online Shopping More Convenient Than Ever

Aug 24, 15 Social Media Is Making Online Shopping More Convenient Than Ever

Posted by in Featured, Technology

Could online shopping be ruining the American economy as we know it? According to the latest research, even the most obscure industries — like health and beauty, for example — are being uprooted by small businesses that have capitalized on the growing trend of e-commerce. Business Insider reported that subscription services for household items have begun to skyrocket among American consumers; everything from razors to shampoo can be reordered automatically and shipped to a customer’s front door. It seems that the main advantage of subscription services for everyday items is mere convenience. Much like online shopping in general, consumers are valuing the convenience of shopping in one’s pajamas on a Sunday morning, or during their lunch hour. As more businesses are starting to discover, a surprising force is behind this trend: social media websites. When it comes to e-commerce, the main benefit of social media for businesses hovers around branding and customer engagement. As Business News Daily reported recently, 90% of e-commerce businesses are on Facebook, 70% are on Twitter, and over 40% use Instagram and/or Pinterest. While promoting the business’s brand is incredibly easy on social media, businesses also have unprecedented and direct access to potential customers. More importantly, the access is made possible through networks of online entertainment and social engagement, which feels less intrusive than traditional advertising. Pinterest, which users often describe as a digital corkboard for “pinning” inspiration and favorite pictures, has become the most recent example of the direct access that businesses have to customers. The website recently added a “Buy It Now” button which sends users directly to a company’s official website where they can purchase a dress, for example, or maybe a holiday decoration they saw, liked, and pinned. As Business 2 Community reported, this one small button has turned simple pictures into “buyable pins” and has provided two services which benefit both the merchants and consumers: the merchants win over more customers, and the consumers don’t have to waste time finding the business’s website to make...

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Will Google Decide the Next Presidential Election?

Aug 24, 15 Will Google Decide the Next Presidential Election?

Posted by in Featured, Technology

To say that the Internet has had a profound impact on the world would be to understate its significance. There are more than 100 billion global search engine inquiries conducted each month, connecting people to new businesses and services, giving them access to information — and determining the next presidential election. In a recent experiment, researchers took a diverse group of undecided voters, let them check out the candidates on Kadoodle (a specially designed search engine), and then counted the votes. They expected the search engine, which they’d rigged to give stories supporting certain candidates better rankings, to sway the choices of the voters, but not by as wide a margin as they discovered. “I couldn’t even believe what we got,” said Robert Epstein, one of the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology’s senior research psychologist. “It seemed impossible … to be able to shift that many undecided voters toward whoever we chose.” Some voters became 20% more likely to support the favored candidate, and almost none of them caught on to what was going on. Even those who did suss out the bias, according to researchers, felt even more validated that they’d made the right choice. The “search engine manipulation effect,” which the series of studies being published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences explore, is nothing new. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is a marketing strategy that aims to improve a business’s search engine ranking to expand its customer base. The more web traffic it gets, the more leads it can convince and convert into customers. However, when search engines are the modi operandi of voters looking to learn more about a candidate, the “search engine manipulation effect” could prove to be worryingly influential. In a sense, all a candidate has to do to win an election is make sure he or she is dominating the search engine results pages. Epstein and fellow researcher Ronald E. Robertson have repeated the study’s results across five double-blind, randomized experiments that have...

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Free Internet Is Coming to Low-Income Areas Thanks to President Obama

Jul 23, 15 Free Internet Is Coming to Low-Income Areas Thanks to President Obama

Posted by in Technology

There are about 4.49 billion web pages on the Internet — but one in four people in the United States can’t access a single one at home. Worse, less than half of the poorest households in the U.S. have home internet access, according to a new report from the White House Council of Economic Advisers. Fortunately, President Obama has a plan to change that. “The Internet is not a luxury,” said Obama during his announcement of his new program. “It is a necessity.” The mission of the White House’s new ConnectHome initiative is to give every child “the same opportunity to build a brighter future and to achieve their dream” by connecting their homes to the web, so that they can access the necessary information to get ahead in school and career life. The ConnectHome initiative will launch in 27 cities and one tribal area, and will initially provide 275,000 low-income households and nearly 200,000 children with Internet access. It will involve city officials, eight Internet providers, at least one university, and even Best Buy, which will provide residents in some cities with computer training. “While many middle-class US students go home to Internet access, allowing them to do research, write papers, and communicate digitally with their teachers and other students, too many lower-income children go unplugged every afternoon when school ends,” said a statement from the White House. “This “homework gap” runs the risk of widening the achievement gap, denying hardworking students the benefit of a technology-enriched education.” Google is also pitching into the initiative. The monolithic tech company is offering free home Internet access to public housing residents in its 12 Google Fiber markets. In areas where there isn’t Google Fiber, but are part of the pilot program, such as New Orleans, heavily discounted broadband hookups are available for about $10 a...

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