Exploring Various St. Patrick’s Day Traditions Around the Country

Mar 14, 17 Exploring Various St. Patrick’s Day Traditions Around the Country

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If you’re looking to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day the right way, you way want to consider taking a trip to one of these major cities all over the country, where officials are preparing for one of the year’s biggest celebrations. Savannah, Georgia holds the oldest St. Patrick’s Day celebration in the country, and that’s why officials are expecting hundreds of thousands of visitors and a major economic boost. “Our expectations are, we are going to have a very busy weekend. Not only in Savannah, throughout the area,” said Joe Marinelli, president/CEO of Visit Savannah. “Whenever we talk about it, we are not talking about just the Historic District, because hotels and restaurants all throughout the Southside, Midtown, and so forth will be busy, and I know that many of the vacation rentals on Tybee Island are expected to be full as well.” The city is preparing for the population spike by keeping more hotel rooms available. As of spring 2014, nearly 21 million U.S. households owned a spa, pool, or hot tub, but during this time of year, they can visit Savannah and still be virtually guaranteed to find a hotel with a pool. “It will be fun to be in the city, we’ll have a lot of visitors, a lot of friends and family coming in. And I know everyone is going to have a good time,” said Marinelli. Motorcoaches account for 751 million passenger trips annually, moving more people in some years than commercial airlines do — that’s why they might be a great way to get from Savannah to Staten Island, where there are countless St. Patrick’s Day festivities to attend. Several residents in New Brighton and West Brighton are notorious for throwing annual pre-parade parties. Jim and Judy Logan from West Brighton are just one couple that’s known for their St. Patrick’s Day parties. The Logans’ home on Myrtle Avenue is just one block away from the parade site, so partiers won’t have to worry about the risks of drinking...

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The Agriculture Industry is Changing Thanks to Technological Advancements and Major Spending

Mar 10, 17 The Agriculture Industry is Changing Thanks to Technological Advancements and Major Spending

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Agriculture has been around for longer than just about every other major industry. Although some things never change in farming and agriculture production, thanks to some highly advanced technological inventions (and billions of dollars of global spending), the agriculture industry can expect to see a lot of major changes in the near future. Some pieces of equipment, like the full-circle hammer mill, can handle 15% higher capacity and produce a 20% coarser grind compared to half-circle hammers. That’s just one common piece of farming equipment improved by modern technology. Although these types of tools are still necessary, the industry could soon see some of their equipment go digital. “The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), working in synergy with other EU policies and funds, is prioritizing innovation and digitisation in agriculture as never before,” said Phil Hogan, EU Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development. “This is essential not only to keep our farmers competitive and profitable but also to protect our precious environment and contribute to EU climate targets and sustainable development goals.” According to a Euractiv Agriculture 4.0 policy paper, the digitalisation on its way will assist farmers and agricultural producers who are stuck in old ways of only using conventional and mechanical pieces of equipment. And with better tools, farmers worldwide will be able to increase output while decreasing labor. The United Nations states that the demand for more technologically advanced agricultural equipment is driven by the increase in global population, as more than 9.7 billion are expected to walk the earth by 2050. Perhaps that’s why the global farm equipment market is actually projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of nearly 10.2% over the next decade. The global farm equipment market is expected to reach $368 billion by 2025. Market officials also attribute the rising growth to the increase in public spending, the rising adoption of precision farming techniques, and favorable government policies on farming...

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3D Scanning Technology Saves Queen Elizabeth II’s Wedding Cake

Mar 01, 17 3D Scanning Technology Saves Queen Elizabeth II’s Wedding Cake

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Traditionally, the wedding cake has served as a symbol of the union of love between a bride and groom, as well as the main centerpiece for the reception. A wedding cake can even be kept for years after the fact; couples typically enjoy part of their frozen wedding cake to celebrate their first wedding anniversary, and there’s a cake that’s survived for over a century (and even withstood a World War II bomb blast!). But in the past, when iconic cakes were destroyed, there wasn’t much hope for resurrection — until now. When Queen Elizabeth II married Prince Philip in 1947, Peek Frean designed a multi-tiered confection aptly fit for a queen. Over six feet tall and weighing 600 pounds, the colossal cake was actually put on display at the Peek Frean and Co. factory until 1989. When the factory closed, a South London museum planned to make a permanent exhibit about the factory that would house the cake. However, it was later deemed too fragile to transport and was left at its original location. In 2015, the famous cake was vandalized almost to complete devastation. It was turned upside down and splattered with red paint. All seemed lost for the historic dessert until Professor Mark Williams and the Warwick Manufacturing Group stepped in with their 3D scanning technology. Williams and his team were able to scan the cake within a 0.1mm accuracy and reproduce it as a 3D model. This model will be used to digitally repair the existing cake. It’s an immensely long process. The cake has been coated and is now ready for decoration, which will occur next month and throughout the early spring in various workshops. The cake will be fully assembled during the late summer. Williams stated, “It was fantastic to apply our technology to such an exciting project and help restore such an iconic cake to its former glory, especially in the year of the Queen’s Golden Anniversary.” The Warwick Manufacturing Group worked closely with the British Sugarcrafting...

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