How To Trick People Into Booking a Beach Vacation During the Winter…

Jan 30, 17 How To Trick People Into Booking a Beach Vacation During the Winter…

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Beach vacations are extremely popular, no matter what time of the year it is. More than half — 52% to be exact — of worldwide survey respondents expect to take a vacation to the beach within the next 12 months. And one of the more popular beach destinations in the world has recently upped their advertising strategy in hopes of increasing its amount of yearly beachgoers. According to WMBF News, the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce (MBACC) is taking advantage of the East Coast’s freezing winter temperatures to spread awareness about vacationing at the beach. Once the snow melts and the spring and summer finally arrive, people are going to be thinking about the beach a lot more. MBACC hopes that Myrtle Beach will be at the top of everyone’s summer to-visit list. “It does give us more telephone calls coming in, more website visits, more online bookings,” said John Taylor, general manager of Myrtle Beach Vacation Rentals. “These things we do see an increase when it does get cold.” The cold months of January and February are actually the two most popular marketing months for the beach because people start not only thinking about their summer vacation ideas, but they actually start planning them. Not only that, but the business association has come up with a clever marketing technique to entice snowbirds to start planning. MBACC uses targeted geo advertisements to show how cold and snowy a certain area of the country is, and then show the warm, sunny shoreline of Myrtle Beach to make people envious of their more comfortable peers. “Have some sort of a warm weather picture for them and that usually gets them ready to make phone calls and check in their vacation times,” Taylor added MCABB usually sees between an 8% and 12% increase in bookings during the winter months, and the chamber is excited about 2017 because of a strong start to the year so far. “Usually if the trend is if you book more, you...

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Americans Are Increasingly Unsafe on the Roads and Drinking and Drowsy Driving is On the Rise

Jan 13, 17 Americans Are Increasingly Unsafe on the Roads and Drinking and Drowsy Driving is On the Rise

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Think driving drunk is the worst thing a driver can do behind the wheel? Think again. A new study has shown that driving while tired is just as dangerous as driving while intoxicated. According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, a person who drives without an adequate amount of sleep not only puts themselves at risk, but everyone else on the road. The AAA found out that losing one to two hours is enough to double a driver’s crash risk, and losing three hours of sleep can quadruple it. The Richmond Register reports AAA’s findings as, “Drivers missing two to three hours of sleep in a 24-hour period more than quadrupled their risk of a crash compared to drivers getting the recommended seven hours of sleep. This is the same crash risk the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration associates with driving over the legal limit for alcohol.” Drowsy driving is responsible for 20% of all fatal auto accidents on the road. Not only is this number concerning, but it confirms the overall trend that Americans are not practicing safe driving habits. 2016 may turn out to be the worst year on record for drunk driving, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports. On average, 28 people a day died from DUI related accidents nationwide. To put this number into perspective, every two minutes a person is injured in a drunk driving crash. These numbers are the highest the country has seen in 50 years, and the NHTSA is trying to get to the bottom of this deadly habit. As a way to prevent intoxicated drivers from getting behind the wheel, NHTSA hopes to implement a new technology that will use sensors to measure a driver’s blood alcohol level before they put their keys into the ignition. Not only will this technology work with cars, but it will be especially beneficial for motorcycle drivers, who are at even higher risk out on the roads. The system is set to be put in place as...

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Scuba Divers May Want to Check In With Their Dentists Before a Dive

Jan 03, 17 Scuba Divers May Want to Check In With Their Dentists Before a Dive

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There are plenty of reasons to have a regular check up with your dentist. Practically all adults (99.7%, according to an American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry survey) believe that a healthy-looking smile is socially important, and nearly three-quarters of Americans think that an unattractive smile could hurt their chances for career success. But scuba diving enthusiasts may have one more reason to add to the list: All of that underwater pressure could be putting a strain on their teeth, mouths, and jaw. A new pilot study from the University of Buffalo School of Dental Medicine suggests that scuba divers might be at increased risk for dental problems during and after dives. The study’s lead author, Vinisha Ranna, is both a dental student and a certified stress and rescue scuba diver. She first contemplated the study after her own experiences with diving, where she would frequently experience a condition known as barodontalgia, or a squeezing sensation on the teeth, while underwater. Barodontalgia is due to the pressure conditions and the equipment involved in scuba diving — including a mouthpiece clenched between the teeth. Ranna set out to discover whether other divers experienced similar challenges. “The potential for damage is high during scuba diving,” said Ranna. “The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface. One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth.” As a pilot study, Ranna sent out a survey to 100 healthy adult scuba diving enthusiasts. Some 41% reported dental problems that seemed related to diving, 42% of which were also barodontalgia. Another 24% reported mouth pain, 22% reported jaw pain, and a few even said that their crowns often became loose during dives. The symptoms were most pronounced for scuba instructors, likely because they spend more time in the water than recreational divers. Based on the results of the pilot study,...

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