Over Half of College Graduates With Student Debt Uncomfortable Getting a Mortgage

Jul 28, 16 Over Half of College Graduates With Student Debt Uncomfortable Getting a Mortgage

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Approximately 59% of homeowners report wishing they understood the details of their mortgage better, but a recent survey reveals that some young adults may not even want mortgages at all. According to the National Association of Realtors Housing Opportunities and Market Experience survey, roughly half of college graduates with student debt are uncomfortable with the idea of taking on a mortgage. Through the first half of the year, NAR’s survey found that about 80% of homeowners and and 62% of renters still say it’s a good time to buy a house. However, two-thirds of non-homeowners and just about half of individuals under the age of 35 with student debt reported being uncomfortable taking on a mortgage. “It’s becoming very evident from this survey and our research released last month that the financial and emotional impact of repaying student debt is contributing to a delay in purchasing a home for many would-be buyers,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist. Despite the lack of interest in mortgages and home ownership, these four-year graduates are actually making up most of the nation’s workforce. The report, “America’s Divided Recovery: College Haves and Have-Nots” reveals that 8.4 million jobs have gone to graduates with a bachelor’s degree in the last year. While this is a great trend for college graduates, the economy seems to be leaving those without a college education behind. Jobs have been created in recent years, but they’re not the same jobs that were lost. The Great Recession destroyed countless blue-collar jobs, and there has been no trend or movement made in attempt to restore those positions. “While it’s reassuring to see the economy back on track, we can’t ignore this tale of two countries with vastly different economic realities for those with and without a college education,” said Tamara Jayasundera, senior economist at the Georgetown Center and co-author of the report. Regardless, the fact that these student debt-holders make up the majority of the U.S. workforce has not encouraged them to buy homes. “At a...

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Study Reveals New York City Pools Cleaner Than Expected

Jul 28, 16 Study Reveals New York City Pools Cleaner Than Expected

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According to a study performed by the New York Post, public pools in the New York City area are cleaner than most people think. The Post took water samples from seven different pools throughout the New York City area and processed them in a lab for comparison. A total of four private and three public pools were surveyed. The sites tested in the study included Dream Downtown, Hampton Inn & Suites, McLaren Park Pool, McCarren Hotel & Pool, Astoria Sports Complex, and Crotona Outdoor Olympic Pool. These pools were located in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx respectively. Results showed that neither of the pools contained coli-form bacteria, which is a common indicator of pathogens such as E.coli. Pools associated with NYC Parks are tested for contamination by the hour. Considering that there are over 309,000 public pools throughout the U.S., it is impressive to see a large city such as New York manage their pools systems so well. Compared to a report the Center for Disease Control (CDC) released in 2013, New York has some of the cleanest pools to be in this summer. The 2013 report from the CDC found that 58% of public pools were contaminated with E. coli, a pathogen commonly found in human feces. In a separate report that was released earlier this year, the CDC stated that around 80% of U.S. public pools violated at least one health and safety rule during inspection. These violations included poor safety equipment, lacking proper amounts of disinfectant concentrate, and abnormal pH levels. Some of these violations can be directly linked to increasing a swimmer’s chances of contraction an infection. Parents and guardians in the greater New York City area can now breathe a sigh of relief knowing that their children will be safe visiting public and private pools this...

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Northwest Missouri State University Adds 2 New Goalkeepers to 2016 Roster

Jul 22, 16 Northwest Missouri State University Adds 2 New Goalkeepers to 2016 Roster

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Tracy Hoza, head soccer coach at Northwest Missouri State University, announced this year’s two new additions to the women’s Bearcat soccer team. Goal keepers Brooke McClusky and Rileigh Spahn have been added to the 2016 roster. “I’m very excited to add to our goalkeeper depth for 2016,” said Hoza. “Brooke’s biggest strength is that she is a great shot stopper and has excellent distribution. The first thing you notice about Rileigh is how athletic she is and her exceptional reaction speed.” McClusky comes with an impressive resume despite spending her 2015 season as a red shirt freshman for the University of Arkansas. According to Maryville Daily, she is a former All-State, All-Region and All-Utah Valley performer at Maple Mountain High School. She currently holds the record at her high school for the highest number of saves. She has five years experience being a goalkeeper with the Utah ODP. Considering that more than 209,000 high school girls play soccer in the U.S., it is likely that both players learned to master their skills while in school. Many times, players learn to do so in hopes of attracting college scouts for scholarship opportunities. Spahn is also a record-holder at her high school. She currently holds the title for single season and single match records for saves at Glenwood High School, where she used to attend. Not only did she excel in sports, but also in academics, too. She was the president of her class, an all-conference academic honoree, and a two-year member of the National Honor Society. Both players are expected to make great additions to the team whose goal is to win this year’s championship. The 2016 season begins on Wednesday, September 7 for the Bearcat soccer team. The girls will play against Rockhurst University in Kansas City. Their first home game will be at Bearcat Pitch on Friday, September 9 against...

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Corporate Debt Projected to Swell to Over $75 Trillion by 2020

Jul 22, 16 Corporate Debt Projected to Swell to Over $75 Trillion by 2020

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The average U.S. household carries an average of $129,579 in total debt, but that’s nothing compared to the projected amount of corporate debt the nation will be seeing in the next few years. By 2020, corporate debt is predicted to swell to $75 trillion from its current standing at $51 trillion, according to S&P Global Ratings. Under normal circumstances, that level wouldn’t be a major issue on the condition that credit quality remains high, interest rates and inflation remain low, and economic growth persists. However, that’s a best-case scenario. If those factors swing in the opposite direction, corporate America could face an issue of disastrous proportions as it seeks to manage its growing debt. In a worst-case scenario, an impending “crexit” could be looming in the not-so-distant future. This would entail a withdrawal by lenders from the credit markets, and could contribute to sudden tightening of conditions and result in yet another financial nightmare. However, corporate America’s issues are dwarfed by the ever-increasing mountain of the nation’s debt. According to data released by the U.S. Treasury, the federal debt moved above $19.4 trillion for the first time as of the close of business on Tuesday. In October 2015, Congress passed the “Bipartisan Budget Act,” which acted to suspend the legal debt limit until March 2017. President Obama signed the bill in November 2015. Less than nine months after the President signed that bill, the federal debt has increased by $1,249,380,205,181.94. “The public debt limit is suspended through March 15, 2017. On March 16, 2017, the limit is increased to accommodate obligations issued during the suspension period,” the Congressional Research Service summary states. Though it accounts for debt on a national level, there will likely be no government intervention to stem the flow of corporate America’s tidal wave of debt. Despite the rapidly increasing debt, central banks have been hesitant to pump the brakes at all. Interest rates remain low globally, generating a sharp increase in both corporate and government debt. “Central banks remain in...

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After Historic Flooding, WV Attorney General Issues Warning to Potential Car Buyers

Jul 19, 16 After Historic Flooding, WV Attorney General Issues Warning to Potential Car Buyers

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Patrick Morrisey, Attorney General of West Virginia, announced to consumers to be careful when shopping and purchasing for vehicles this summer because of potential scams. According to West Virginia Record, due to the major flooding that West Virginia experienced this summer, vehicles that were submerged by the flooding are going up for sale. Morrisey wants to make sure these damaged vehicles aren’t sold to unsuspected car buyers. “With so many vehicles destroyed by this summer’s historic flooding,” Morrisey said, “it’s plausible someone may try to take advantage of the situation. That’s why potential car buyers must be on guard and watch for deals that seem too good to be true.” On average, car buyers go into a purchasing contract relatively blind. Wholly 52% of consumers don’t know what make or model they want to purchase before even walking into a dealership. The Attorney General encourages consumers to be more vigilant than usual when searching for online deals. West Virginia state law prohibits the resale of a submerged vehicle without a salvaged title. This means that anyone trying to sell a submerged vehicle needs to repair the total loss with a licensed salvaged mechanic, including documentation of its salvage title and redeemed status. Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that the West Virginia Legislature almost passed a law that would allow auto dealers to sell vehicles “as is.” “With current law,” said Dave McMahon, Charleston public interest lawyer, “if you buy a vehicle and it ends up having problems because of it, you get your money back. With ‘as is,’ you’re stuck with it, unless you specifically asked, ‘Was it in the flood?’ and the dealer lied to you.” Morrisey recommends consumers obtain a vehicle’s history from CARFAX, have a reputable mechanic inspect the vehicle in question before the purchase, pay particular attention to a vehicle that’s had multiple owners over a short period of time, and maintain a “buyer beware”...

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