Millennials Would Rather See Nudes Leaked Than Financial Info

Jul 31, 15 Millennials Would Rather See Nudes Leaked Than Financial Info

Posted by in Featured, Lifestyle

Turns out Millennials are a little more financially responsible than initially assumed — although they do already spend $913 million of their own money on school supplies. A recent survey by Braun Research for MasterCard Safety and Security reports that 62% of Millennials would rather have their nude photographs leaked than their financial information. Jordan Bebout, a student at the University of North Florida, says that she’d “rather have [her] financial info compromised.” She adds, “Probably because I’m a college student with no money, so they don’t have anything to steal. [But] nudes are harder to get off of the Internet.” But she was a part of the minority. Of the 305 participants, over half of them would rather see their nudes online than their bank statements. It’s not necessarily surprising to hear that Millennials don’t really want to deal with a financial security breach. But why the cavalier attitude towards their naked pictures floating around the web? According to Dr. Thomas Plante, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University, as well as a Stanford University School of Medicine adjunct professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, these survey answers could be the result of many things. “It could reflect our Kim Kardashian-style culture where people feel more and more comfortable posting intimate details of their lives, including nudity, online… There is a narcissism and exhibitionism flavor to our culture that seems to be driven by a variety of factors such as social media, celebrity culture and so forth.” With over 30 million active Snapchat users, and over 50 million active Tinder users (with the number growing every day), it’s not unrealistic that many of these Millennials may have to face one, if not both, of these options at some point in their lives. But it goes to show that you can never be too careful when protecting your assets, even if your assets are in, well, your...

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Biggest Private Piece of Land for Sale

Jul 31, 15 Biggest Private Piece of Land for Sale

Posted by in Featured, Lifestyle

According to a recent report from The Independent, the largest private piece of land on Earth is for sale. Unlike the average 2015 home sale price of $136,000, the 23,000 square kilometer stretch of cattle farms, previously belonging to the family of Sir Sidney Kidman, costs $325 million. Kidman claimed the land over 100 years ago, after gaining fame as the country’s greatest pastoralist. Growing his own crops made Kidman a healthy retiree, which 81% of retirees will agree is the most important part of retirement. Though all that land couldn’t hurt. To complete the property inspection, it will take each of the 30 bidders a full week to tour the whole South Australian property by plane. The land for sale is almost 2/3 the size of England, or nearly the same size as New Hampshire. A piece of land this large was bound to carry some baggage with it. There were many rumors circulating that the Kidman family did not want to sell the land at all. However, Don Manifold, the selling agent’s managing partner, said that the family was on board with putting up the land for sale. He commented: “There is some hysteria at the moment about foreign land ownership and I understand people’s concerns, but this is a very well-managed cattle business and the Federal government and [three state and one territory] governments and the Foreign Investment Review Board will all be involved because we are talking about long term pastoral leases here. It is extraordinary that it has been in the one family until the fifth generation, is debt free, consistently well run, prime cattle producer.” The land will be officially sold after the bidders all finish their week-long flying...

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U.S. News And World Report Touts Annuities As Investment To Watch

Jul 31, 15 U.S. News And World Report Touts Annuities As Investment To Watch

Posted by in Featured, Lifestyle

On July 29, U.S. News and World Report touted annuities as a hot new investment for the coming years. The report concluded that these “misunderstood” investments were seeing record sales and overdue for high-tech innovations that will greatly increase their appeal. Recent regulatory changes are also improving the reputation of annuities this summer. This July, the IRS released an official notice of new regulations, which would place strict limits on the ability of financial institutions, like insurers, to offer lump sum payments instead of the standard defined benefit annuity payments. In certain types of annuity plans, retirees were being offered lump sum payouts rather than lifetime payments, which the IRS said transferred an unacceptable amount of risk to retirees. Not only that, but the normally divided California legislature unanimously voted to prevent insurance companies from levying surrender charges on death benefit annuities. Surrender charges fined annuity holders for withdrawing funds early, a practice opposed by politicians and senior citizen advocacy groups. In 2013, there were about 34 million outstanding annuity contracts, valued at a total of $2.5 trillion. This year, the recent changes by the IRS, states like California, and the expectation of technology related innovation in annuity sales have investors reconsidering their take on annuities. “By 2020, we’re going to see people able to buy annuities direct,” said annuities expert Stan Haithcock. “Whenever you have that kind of online sales model, you get a guy like Jeff Bezos who takes an Amazon approach and says, ‘I’m going to sell annuities direct.’ “In fact, it surprises me that Bezos hasn’t done it already.” Investors and consumers have often been wary of fixed benefit annuities, which are often far too complex for laypeople to understand. Others criticize annuities with early withdrawal surrender charges, which place strict limits on the annuity holder’s financial flexibility. Although California will prevent surrender charges starting January 1, 2016, most types of annuity contracts will remain...

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Health Groups Eager To Spread Awareness Of Uterine Fibroids, New Treatments

Jul 31, 15 Health Groups Eager To Spread Awareness Of Uterine Fibroids, New Treatments

Posted by in Featured, Health

Around the country, women’s health organizations have been trying to raise awareness of uterine fibroids, the most common cause of benign tumors suffered by women of childbearing age. And as more women and healthcare providers look for solutions, healthcare companies are stepping up their investment in treating the condition. This July, Georgia is hosting “Fibroid Awareness Month” to highlight the millions of U.S. women who “suffer in silence” each year. Although uterine fibroids are benign tumors, they can cause pain and discomfort, extremely heavy periods (which in turn can cause anemia), constipation and frequent urination. In addition, they are the leading cause of hysterectomies, the surgical removal of the uterus. By some estimates, one in two U.S. women will suffer from uterine fibroids in their lifetime. Doctors have also recently discovered that uterine fibroids disproportionately affect African-American women. A 2013 study by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine determined that black women experienced an average of 9.9 fibroids, compared to 4.5 fibroids in white women. As awareness of this health problem grows, companies are investing tens of millions of dollars in non-surgical treatment options. The most common treatment for uterine fibroids are hysterectomies, an extremely invasive surgery that causes the early onset of menopause. Recently, radiofrequency ablation techniques like the Acessa method have provided a non-invasive alternative, an outpatient procedure that allows women to recover in five to nine days. In radiofrequency ablation treatments, doctors use a combination of ultrasounds and heat to shrink fibroids so they can be reabsorbed by the body. Such non-invasive radiofrequency treatments have proven so popular that this July, women’s healthcare company Gynesonics announced they raised $43 million to further develop their non-invasive treatment options. There are also medicines available to help manage symptomatic uterine fibroids. Some commonly prescribed medications include “gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa),” such as Lupron and Soladex. Uterine fibroids commonly affect women in their 30s and 40s, although they sometimes shrink naturally during menopause. If you suspect you may be suffering from uterine fibroid symptoms...

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Anglers Angry Over Bahamas’ New Fishing Rules, Which Favor Bahamians

Jul 30, 15 Anglers Angry Over Bahamas’ New Fishing Rules, Which Favor Bahamians

Posted by in Featured, Legal

Proposed new fishing rules in the Bahamas have American fly fishing lovers up in arms, with some outraged anglers proposing a boycott. At Hatch Mag, incensed writer Ty Hansen described the proposed rules as “some of the most inane pablum coming from the Bahamian side the Caribbean since Columbus sailed past the northern tip of Long Island and proclaimed himself the master of the Indies.” An estimated 3.83 million Americans spend about $750 million on fly fishing in the U.S. each year, and many elite anglers prize Bahamian waters as prime hunting grounds for the silver bonefish. Now, U.S. fly anglers say the draconian new rules would place far too many restrictions on foreign anglers and guides. For their part, the Bahamian Department of Marine Fisheries says the rules are designed to prevent over fishing and help Bahamian citizens enter the local fishing industry. In a recommendation letter to the Department of Marine Fisheries, the Bahamas Fly Fishing Industry Association (BFFIA) recommends that foreign visitors and groups should be required to hire certified local guides at a ratio of two visitors per guide. In addition, the new rules would limit foreign ownership of fishing lodges, locations where many anglers come to stay and fish. In the future, fishing lodges would be required to have a majority Bahamian ownership. Anglers who don’t want to hire local guides, called unguided anglers (UGAs) in the letter, would be restricted to designated zones, to be determined by local guides and lodges. In effect, the rules would give the BFFIA and local fishing guides strict oversight of virtually all fishing in Bahamian waters, including the right to sell (and deny) fishing permits. “This kills the DIY game fairly handily for most of us,” wrote angry angler Bjorn Stromsness. “There would be no more exploring on your own in the Bahamas. You’d have a beat assigned to you, to walk like hundreds before you. I won’t do it.” The BFFIA maintains the rules will prevent overfishing and stimulate the local...

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