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Montana’s Economy Benefiting from Increase in High-Tech Jobs and Companies

Apr 29, 16 Montana’s Economy Benefiting from Increase in High-Tech Jobs and Companies

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The rest of the country may view Montana as nothing but farmland and rolling plains, but a new emphasis on technology could change this narrative in the near future. According to the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, a new report from the University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research has revealed that the state’s high-tech industry is one of the fastest growing in the nation. The Montana High-Tech Business Alliance has doubled its membership in the past year, creating nearly 940 new jobs. Furthermore, Montana’s high-tech jobs are paying an average of $56,800, which is more than twice the median salary for workers in other industries. One successful tech company in Montana, Wisetail, specializes in creating online training programs for firms like The Cheesecake Factory and Jamba Juice. While the company’s home base in Bozeman, MT, used to scare off some clients, it now actually helps to attract more business. “It was a bit of a liability,” said Justin Bigart, owner of Wisetail. “We would be thought of as ‘less than’ our peers in San Francisco — less smart, less capable, less fast. Now, Bozeman is a critical part of our brand. We hold our annual user conference in Bozeman. Now it’s a competitive advantage.” As companies like Wisetail help to redefine the national image of Montana, more people are flocking to The Treasure State in search of lucrative jobs. In fact, Montana’s population is projected to grow by 14.1% by 2043, which is largely due to its recent emphasis on technology. In addition to attracting workers from other states, Montana is also focused on growing its tech industry from within. The Montana Code School, which teaches skills that are essential in today’s technological world, is the fastest growing department at Montana State University. “It’s amazing to see what’s going on with the high-tech industry in Montana,” said John Paxton, head of MSU’s computer science department. “It’s accelerating.” The Montana Code School is boasting a 90% job placement rate for graduates, and most alumni...

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Grants Help Autistic Children Nationwide Learn to Swim

Apr 20, 16 Grants Help Autistic Children Nationwide Learn to Swim

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April is autism awareness month, and all across the country, people are participating in activities highlighting autism and those affected by the disorder. And some are doing this by swimming. Drowning is the number one cause of death in kids with autism. They don’t have fear of the water or the skills to ask for help. Considering one in five drowning deaths is a child 14 years or younger, educating children with autism about water safety can save lives. A grant in Jacksonville, FL, is providing free swimming lessons to those vulnerable children. WJAX-TV reports these lessons have become a relief for parents. Kimberly Belzer’s 12-year-old son Brandon is non-verbal, so he often communicates by hitting. But when he is in the pool, Brandon is calm and his hands are used for paddling. Swimming Safari owner Joani Maskell says that being able to offer free swimming lessons to parents is priceless. “They’re drawn to water, wherever they are. They might jump in the pool. They might jump in the ocean. They might jump in a retention pond,” Maskell says, so giving them the skills of being able to swim in case of an emergency is life changing. In Baraboo, WI, the children are given challenges such as putting their faces in the water, blowing bubbles, floating on their backs, and kicking their legs. These swimming lessons also reinforce goals the children are working on in their various therapy sessions. If they are taking speech therapy, blowing bubbles helps to train the facial muscles with rounding their lips forming the /b/ and /p/ sounds. Making a motorboat noise helps them approximate their lips for the /m/ sound. Being immersed in a body of water gives children with autism the sensation they are in a safe and supported...

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Rogue Dentist Leaves Patient Toothless After Routine Procedure Goes Wrong

Apr 15, 16 Rogue Dentist Leaves Patient Toothless After Routine Procedure Goes Wrong

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An Indiana man had all of his teeth removed during what was supposed to be a routine dental procedure last month. Donny Grisby went to White River Dental to have four of his teeth pulled. When he awoke, however, he discovered that a lot more had been taken from him. Donny Grisby realized that he was completely toothless. Grisby’s wife, Amanda, sat in the waiting room for more than five hours. When her husband finally came out, he was unconscious, unresponsive, covered in blood, and being taken to the hospital. During the ambulance ride, Donny flatlined twice, almost losing his life. The family is demanding an explanation. The dentist told the Grigsbys that all of Donny’s teeth had to be removed because they had found an infection. In other words, rather than allow the infection to spread, the dentist came to the conclusion that full removal of the teeth was the only safe and reasonable option. According to White River Dental’s official statement, “Every patient and issue is different and we evaluate each and every part of the oral cavity and the health of the patient before presenting a treatment plan.” This would make sense except for the part about “presenting a treatment plan.” Neither Donny nor his wife was presented with a treatment plan that involved removing all of the teeth, and Donny certainly did not consent to such a dangerous and life-altering procedure. “I am so ashamed now,” Donny told a local Indiana reporter from 14 News. “I have no teeth. I woke up with no clothes on. I was scared.” Donny has suffered further damage as a result of the surgery; he now has blood clots and is forced to use an oxygen tank. He is in incredible pain and unable to go to work. The family plans to file a malpractice suit. As for Donny’s dental future, dentures or implants seem to be the logical choice. As many as 3 million people currently have implants, but how many of them...

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Testosterone Levels in Men Linked to Empathy in Studies

Besides cultural and socially instilled differences, what are the real differences between men and women and the reasons behind their behaviors? A new study shows that some of it may have to do with empathy, and the respective genders’ ability to detect it. The study showed that women may be more empathetic than men because of the effect of the hormone testosterone on men’s brains. The study, led by Dr. Peter Bos of Utrecht University, tested a small group of women who were given oral testosterone at doses high enough to boost their testosterone blood levels. They were then asked to identify the emotions of people, just by looking at pictures of their eyes. Women traditionally score higher on this test than do males. Women who had taken the testosterone took longer to identify emotions and made more mistakes than the women who did not. Further brain scans showed that a single dose of testosterone was enough to alter the connections between regions of the brain associated with emotional processing. This will not be good news for the one in four men over 30 who research has suggested have low testosterone levels. Many of these men seek hormone therapy to repair the imbalance, which can cause health issues and sexual impotence. Other studies in recent years have confirmed the finding of Dr. Bos and his team. A University of Michigan study from last year found that when men saw their small children in distress, it lowered their testosterone. This, and the father’s relationship with the infant’s mother, had a large part in determining whether or not they were nurturing fathers. The study found that a crying baby can illicit some emotions that can be accompanied by a corresponding hormonal reaction. The data was collected from 175 men who were expecting their second child with their partner. “We are not arguing that universal decline in testosterone will always be associated with ‘good fathering,’ said Brenda Volling, the co-author of the study.”Perhaps increases in men’s testosterone...

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